New Jersey employees naturally want to avoid injuries on the job. Their desire to remain safe, however, can either be encouraged or discouraged by management. An employer that consistently communicates safety procedures to employees and invites their feedback about potential safety problems can reduce incidents by as much as 70 percent compared to disengaged employers.

Employers can successfully manage workplace hazards by training all staff members about safety instead of leaving those concerns solely in the hands of a safety manager. Safety management software helps companies track data about injuries. This technology can also include mobile applications where workers can view safety alerts. An involved staff that has access to updates about safety guidelines and knows that problems can be reported without retaliation will produce better results than employees kept in the dark about safety issues.

When employers do not know if their employees understand or follow safety regulations, the organizations could experience high rates of injuries and fatalities. Workers could become unhappy with their environment, and productivity could go down. More accidents translate into higher insurance premiums that eat away at profit margins.

In an effort to control insurance costs, companies sometimes place barriers between injured workers and the benefits that they are entitled to. People who have been injured on the job are generally eligible for workers’ compensation regardless of whose fault the accident was. An employer’s interference with these rights as well as retaliating for exercising them is prohibited, and workers who are in this position might want to discuss their situation with an attorney.